Repair your gut after taking antibiotics

Taking antibiotics needs repairing your gut health

Firstly, let’s not totally dismiss antibiotics. After all, they can be life saving and in certain situations, become absolutely necessary. They’ve saved millions of lives. That being said, antibiotics today are over-prescribed and often unnecessary. Developments to prevent and treat infectious diseases like sanitation, early vaccines and best-use of antibiotics have dramatically reduced deaths from infectious disease but there is a cost.

Antibiotics can become detrimental because they damage your gut ecosystem, what we collectively call our microbiome, which is made up of 100 trillion bugs that live inside you and outnumber your cells an astounding 10 to 1.

True, antibiotics wipe out the bad stuff that is causing the infection; but they are like napalm—they take out everything in their path—including the good bacteria that controls immunity, regulates digestion and intestinal function, protects against infections and even produces vitamins and nutrients.

Antibiotics destroy these beneficial bacteria, which creates a wide open field for the overgrowth of bad bugs, yeast and candida, leading to numerous problems including mood disorders, food allergies, fatigue, skin issues and of course, digestive issues.

Overgrowth of bad bugs can also encourage cravings for sugary, processed junk foods, leading to weight gain and other problems that eating junk foods creates. So it is clear that antibiotics can potentially make you fat.

Few things recommended before and after using antibiotics.

First, add in the good stuff. Eat a low-glycemic, whole-foods diet and take quality probiotics and prebiotics. A high-quality, multi-strain probiotic helps populate your gut with beneficial bacteria. Prebiotics, a form of soluble fiber, which also helps feed good bugs, which can be found in onions, garlic, resistant starch, sweet potatoes, dandelion greens and jicama.

Unlike regular starch, your small intestine doesn’t absorb potato starch. Instead, your gut bacteria process it, creating molecules that help balance blood sugar and healthy gut flora. In other words, when you consume resistant starch, it “resists” digestion and does not spike blood sugar or insulin.

I like to supplement with my favorite resistant starch found in Bob’s Red Mill Unmodified Potato Starch. I suggest adding about 1 teaspoon to a glass of water.

Then, focus on gut repair—especially after you’re finished using antibiotics. Utilize gut-healing nutrients including L-glutamine, omega-3 fats, vitamin A and zinc to repair your gut lining so it can resume its normal, natural functions. The use of digestive enzymes can help you digest your food better.